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Discussion on: Am I Smart Enough?

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mycarrysun profile image
Mike Harrison

My favorite way to learn is by actually coding and my favorite format is when you have instructions on the left and real code that runs in the browser on the right (or vice versa). Codecademy has this, not sure of others but you mentioned JavaScript and they have a good JavaScript 101 course I would recommend to learn the basics.

The most important thing is to just keep going. Don't let yourself get discouraged and quit programming altogether (if that's really what you want to do). Instead, take a break, maybe even wait til the next day, or work on another problem. It's very tough to teach yourself but it's also extremely rewarding. I'm self taught and have been programming for about 10 years now and will say I've seen the same thing about YouTube and other sources being better or learning more from them compared to a formal class. There's nothing wrong with that and honestly I think it's awesome that that exists.

Once you go through some 101 courses you should definitely work on a portfolio website. You can kill 2 birds by learning coding as you work on it while also putting together a site that you can show during interviews which is very helpful. If you don't have anything right now to put in your portfolio that's fine, just work on an about me page and use some fake projects (then you can fill them in later from projects in your bootcamp or other side projects).

Hope this helps, you definitely have the right attitude. I wasn't sure what I was gonna read when I saw the title but you are spot on in how you're thinking and not giving up!

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marilia profile image
Marilia Author

Thank you so much for sticking through to the end of the post haha!

Now that you've been in the field for so long, would you do it differently? Would you still go the self-taught route, or maybe sign up for a bootcamp?
Although I do feel like with this bootcamp I am self-taught because I'm doing the "part-time", set your own pace course path (when actually I am doing this full-time now lol), I don't know if I ever would truly go the 100% self-taught route

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mycarrysun profile image
Mike Harrison

I definitely would go the bootcamp route, only because it gives you credentials in a matter of about 16 weeks that most jobs will hire you as a junior. When I was first starting I went to college and (in my opinion) wasted 3 years when I could've just taught myself all that for a lot less money. If college were the same price as a bootcamp it would be different but it's not and I just see it as a waste unfortunately since it creates so much debt. Developers have it really good now with bootcamps and all the websites that have self taught courses so it's much easier to go the self taught route in 2022.