markdown guide
 

Python is probably your best bet unless you have some specific goal in mind. It's dead simple to learn, exceedingly powerful, and has a mature ecosystem supporting it.

Other possibilities that come to mind include:

  • C. Not C++, not C#, just plain C. Despite being almost half a century old, C is actually still very widely used, and derivatives of it (either direct or indirect) regularly show up in lists of the most popular programming languages. Learning C makes it much easier to learn C++, C# and Objective-C, as well as providing a solid foundation from which to learn other languages, so you can quickly branch out as well. Setup of a development environment for learning is a bit of a pain though if you are on Windows or macOS (both platforms make you jump through hoops to get a working build environment for C).
  • C#. Very popular right now, and especially relevant if you want to go into game development (because Unity (one of the most popular game engines in the world right now) uses it). Also not super easy to set up a development environment for learning it.
  • JavaScript. If you want to go into web development, JS is the only practical option for a first language. The downside is that JS has quiute a few peculiarities that may make it harder to branch out to other languages in the future.
 

Learning Java as my first programming language didn't go well..
You can look at different programming languages and find one that you're comfortable working with and looks human readable (such as python).

 

I'd recommend python as a good place to start. You'll feel motivated and curious to discover concepts about programming through the language. After that don't get comfortable, pick up a new language and this will be easier provided you have a strong understanding of the concepts of programming.

 

That all depends on what you want to do.

If you're interested in webdev, then obviously JavaScript is essential. For mobile development, Swift for IOS, and Kotlin or Java for Android. Game development uses a lot of C++, although I wouldn't call it beginner friendly.

Otherwise I'd probably recommend a scripting language, such as bash, and then move onto Java, C, or Ruby.

 

Do you have a sense of what sort of programs you want to build? There's no "right" or "wrong" place to get started, but some tools are better suited to specific tasks than others. If you already know what you want to do, let's start there.

If you're just starting out, you might not know at all yet and that's okay too - I definitely didn't until I started writing a lot of code. If that's the case, your hashtag - Python - is a great place to start. It's simple to get started writing basic programs with, and powerful enough to let you start exploring all different sorts of programming.

 

Thanks to all for guiding me... as a beginner.

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