re: Should I learn Go? VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

If you've not learned a system level language before, like C or C++, then learning Go is probably a good idea. I have no idea what the language is like, but I'm assuming it exposes concepts you've not yet been exposed to. Even if you end up not using Go, learning new concepts will help you in whatever direction you go.

Don't pick it for hype though. Pick it for learning. And don't hesitate to drop it if isn't helping you in some way.

 

I have been a C++ programmer for a few years so I know what system level language is like and the whole concept, I actually I like it.

I am not choosing Go because of the hype, I am trying to figure out if there is something behind this hype. The one thing that really caught my eyes is the amazing performance of Go due to the fact it's a system level language.

 

I believe a lot of the hype is sadly due to it's "concurrency" model which is now a buzzword which also ends up getting conflated with another buzzword "parallelism".

Go is definitely a SOLID language (pun intended), but it does have it's warts:

  • 📦management
  • 🚫generics (yet?)
  • too many ways to declare a var
  • etc, etc

I do think...

There are 2 types of programming languages: one nobody uses and the other everybody complains about - somebody?

Personally, I really enjoy writing Go (for work and play) and being apart of it's community (for work and play).

 

Don't pick it for hype though. Pick it for learning. And don't hesitate to drop it if isn't helping you in some way.

That's what I did, I steered clear of it for a long time because of the hype, now I'm still unsure if I like it because I like it or if I like it because I'm learning something different from the day to day. I'll get to the answer eventually

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