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re: What are the worst programming languages that nobody should learn? VIEW POST

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Python because copy / pasting can be painfull !

 

If you care about code readability and quality, you are gonna reindent it anyway.

 

Why would copy-pasting be substantially more painful with Python than any other programming language?

 

Could it be the case that nobody would ever need to learn Python?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Python_%28pr...

Evil advocate counter-argument:

The fact that copy/pasting can be painful can be seen as a good constraint for a developer who wants to master his craft. It's painful to copy/paste. Fine. Then I have to find better ways to come up with code. That will probably be a big win in the long term

Apart from that, Python has a massive developer community that produces lots of good stuff. They are expert at teaching programming to beginners, to non-programmers who need to program. It's a great solution for prototyping stuff. It is used at Google, Facebook Instagram, Spotify and a lot more. It's a great solution for data science, scripting, backend programming.

And I'm just scratching the surface because I don't know a lot about python. Just imagine what someone good at Python and who like it could reply!

So suggesting nobody would ever need to learn Python is courageous because transparently wrong :)

 

"The fact that copy/pasting can be painful can be seen as a good constraint for a developer who wants to master his craft. It's painful to copy/paste. Fine. Then I have to find better ways to come up with code. That will probably be a big win in the long term"
When you have 20+ years of experiences you really don't care about mastering : you want to be efficient.

By the way despite this it's a good language with a good community, I just regret this poor syntax choice even if at first it sounds good.

Oh I agree with you on both points.
1) Being efficient matter and those little things should be fixed
2) Building a language is something, building a good language community is even more important

 

Copy pasting what, and where? I'm not sure I understand the reasoning here, unless it's a joke that I don't get.

 

Think they're talking about potential indentation errors!

Which aren't a problem if your text editor was made in the last 40 years.

 

I've heard that argument before, to copy/paste you just add the proper amount of space, unless you are using ed or nano is very trivial. On the other hand, Python2/Python3 being 90% of books and half of tutorials in py2, that's is somewhat annoying for new users.

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