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Discussion on: React vs Vue vs Angular vs Svelte

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maoosi profile image
Sylvain (:seel-vahn)

React with a smaller learning curve than Vue.js 🤔

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hb profile image
Henry Boisdequin Author

They were very tight but I would say that React has a smaller learning curve as its more intuitive and has easier syntax than Vue.

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maoosi profile image
Sylvain (:seel-vahn)

Sorry @hb, you've decided to go on a touchy subject by writing this article! I will have to disagree with you on that point.

I think it's perfectly okay to prefer using React. There are many reasons why it is a good choice. However, an easy learning curve isn't part of it.

Just so there is no ambiguity, after having used all the Frameworks from this article - my choice goes towards Vue.js and Svelte, but I'll try to remain as objective as possible.

1) According to the State of JS survey 2018 (not using 2019, because that same question wasn't part of last year's survey). From 20,268 developers interrogated, the number #1 argument about Vue.js is an easy learning curve. For React it comes at position #11 (top 3 beings: elegant programming style, rick package ecosystem, and well-established):

2018.stateofjs.com/front-end-frame...
2018.stateofjs.com/front-end-frame...

2) Main reason why Vue.js is labelled "The Progressive JavaScript Framework", is because it is progressive to implement and to learn. Before you can get started with React, you need to know about JSX and build systems. On the other end, Vue.js can be used just by dropping a single script tag into your page and using plain HTML and CSS. This makes a huge difference in terms of approachability of the Framework.

3) Maybe less objective on this one - but from my own professional experience with both Frameworks and leading teams of developers - it usually takes Junior Developers almost twice the time to become proficient with React than with Vue.js. Firstly because of what I mentioned in point number 2. Secondly, because React has few abstraction leaks that makes performance optimisation something developers have to deal with themselves (using memoize hooks). It's a concept that is hard to understand, but essentials if working on large applications. Thirdly, because of the documentation (as you mentioned in your article). And lastly because of the fragmented ecosystem of libraries that can quickly be overwhelming for Junior Devs.

Again, I think there are a lot of reasons why React can be a good choice. But not because of the learning curve.