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How often do you maintain the code that's not a part of your favorite stack?

madza profile image Madza ・1 min read

For example, you are focusing on mastering MERN stack, but you still have to maintain codebases written in PHP and jQuery (no offense).

How often do you find yourself in situations like these?

Discussion (13)

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yoursunny profile image
Junxiao Shi

The stallion coder does not deal with legacy code. I rewrite it every other year in my favorite stack.

PHP: it is still one of my favorites.
jQuery: rewrite in RE:DOM or Preact upon sight.

Sad truth: the most popular page on my website is written in jQuery 1.x version.
The page looks completely different from everything else on my website.
The app, made in 2010, is so complicated that I don't have the stomach to rewrite it yet.

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metalmikester profile image
Michel Renaud

I'm largely doing web development these days, but I'm often called to help with some specific work in a WPF application (I used that for many years, but it's been a solid 7 years since I actively developed in WPF). For the past few months it's been almost weekly, from a few minutes to several days. It's been 10 days now, which is surprising. Hopefully I didn't jinx it by mentioning it. :D

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madza profile image
Madza Author

Hahah, I feel you 😀😀 What's your current stack, just curious 👀😀

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metalmikester profile image
Michel Renaud

It's ASP.Net Core 3.1, mix of Razor pages, JavaScript, jQuery, Tailwind CSS (though I leave most of that to the UX team. who are better at making things look good). C# for the backend part with SQL Server for the database (but I don't though the database stuff at all; a library is used to talk to the database).

For my own web site, it's LAMP, but that thing needs a major rewrite. I started working on it, but I'm often too tired at night to get any of that done.

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Andrei Dascalu

I've earned the luxury of never having to do that. With 15 years of php behind me I'm still ok doing new projects in modern frameworks like Symfony 5 or Spiral but I have the power to stay away from older projects or work with older stacks.
I will always jump head first even into older Go projects, I've yet to encounter a legacy projects that feels legacy in the same way that looking at WordPress code base does.

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kak_kotyavo profile image
KAK KOTYAVO!

constantly, when I create a user interface on vanillaJS, sometimes I have to cram jQuery :cry

the main thing is to try the idea, quickly

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madza profile image
Madza Author

curious, what's your current stack? 👀

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kak_kotyavo profile image
KAK KOTYAVO!

Current stack: nodejs/php
I create various constructors, advertisements and other tools.
Client side: nodejs (gulp -> babel(es6), browserify, tinyify, exorcist)
Backend: NodeJS/PHP, Database: clickhouse, PG/Mysql, mongo

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Julien Maury

Opensource and personal projects are a great great way to enjoy modern technology.

Professionally speaking, I try to do the same, but it's no so uncommon to deal with some legacy code. It's not the most fun part, but there are many things to learn too.

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pavel_polivka profile image
Pavel Polívka

I more or less work as a problem solver. I am trying not have a favourite stack, but be more or less familiar with everything our large team does so that I can help there if needed. So I am switching technologies, stacks, platforms, etc.. on daily basis.

There are times I am not very familiar with the technology needed (mostly mobile development) so I am trying to avoid that :D

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Kinanee Samson • Edited

Everyday at work, php is not bad but it's not my thing either

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Ryan Rickgauer

Monday-Friday 8am-5pm, 48 weeks of the year

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Benjamin Kooiman-Cox

I'm a Pythonista at home, but at work I maintain C#/ASP.NET codebases.

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