re: How to Refactor Your Finances - An Interview With a Programmer Who Retired at 34 VIEW POST

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re: You've misunderstood my issue with the FIRE movement, but your argument is still specious in that it assumes spending even less than what was a pre...

I suppose you could be right. This article is the first I heard of FIRE so I haven't read any plans. That needing medical prevents cutting back other costs.

But I thought I still covered the medical because they are supposedly have high deductible insurance so the 300,000 seems unlikely to actually be the cost.

Couldn't find a laid out plan so I searched for the specific issue and it seems they have reasonable answers to things.

google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2...

Yes my concern is somewhat exaggerated but the solutions posited in that article are:

  1. Spend thousands flying around the world to get cheaper healthcare -- probably a wash unless you already built travel expenses into your budget;
  2. Spend $700/mo (about 20% of the 40k/yr budget);
  3. Get insurance through your working spouse -- not FIRE.

My concern is only for folks planning to retire and stay in the USA. Healthcare is not something you might need, it is something you will need at some unpredictable point in some unpredictable amount.

You had me going at first, but after going back to the article I realized that isn't what they were suggesting.

"she took a job after he retired). Should they need to self-insure in the future, Mr. Jensen would likely use a health care cooperative like Liberty HealthShare, as other FIRE adherents have"

So never mind, I'm out.

Cool, I'm not sure how the health share plan that requires a commitment to a faith-based lifestyle and still costs 15% of the 40k/yr budget contradicts my point, but yeah we're done.

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