re: Anybody still working with jQuery? VIEW POST

TOP OF THREAD FULL DISCUSSION
re: Assuming that people doing jQuery are maintaining legacy code is not necessarily right. In my company, there is no people trained on modern front...
 

I wholeheartedly agree with your post.

Actually, some people who have seen the code for my jQuery project expected a mess of spaghetti code, which is not at all!
I told them spaghetti code is not framework exclusive, nor a jQuery requirement.

It's bad programming practice, and it can happen on any and every framework.

 
 

What are some things jQuery is good for -that you can't already do with vanilla Js?

What implementation of "vanilla JS"?

I don't actually work with these things, but I did learn that when you're supporting browsers back to IE 6, jquery is very handy.

JQuery is excellent at browser compatibility: you just use it's simple-short-to-write functional syntax and it runs everywhere.

Doesn't it remind nicely the JVM?

Writing modern js is easy to get full compatability with babel or polyfills

Do you call Babel and Polyfills « Vanilla JavaScript » ? It's already JavaScript with super-powers.

There are people who do jQuery and who doesn't know how to set up those kind of environments. And their company don't want them to learn and/or they aren't interested to go further on their own.

I don't say it is good, and it should surely be avoided, but the simplicity of use of jQuery is for sure a great plus. Overusing it at a certain point for complex applications today is surely a mistake and the tools you mentioned should be used in most of the cases.

Is it though? When do you pull in a polyfill? Is it for every JS feature you use? Did you remember to check the compatibility guide?

Im not saying you want to go without testing, but testing is all about figuring out what is not needed to be tested.

code of conduct - report abuse