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Which IDE is better? VScode or JetBrains' WebStorm?

gautham495 profile image Gautham Vijayan ・1 min read

I have been using vs code for about a year now. As I got the github student pack, Now I have access to all the jetbrains IDE till I am a student.

Is jetbrains better than vscode?

Please give your views in the comments Section so I can get your opinions.

Discussion (21)

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mxlt profile image
Mxlt

I think they are different things. VS Code is a code editor and not an IDE, while jetbrains is many things. Jetbrains has various different IDEs.

stackoverflow.com/questions/528299...

differencebetween.net/technology/d...

Visual Studio (not code) IS an IDE though.

What is better for you? I think it sums up for what you are using it for. I work at many projects using VS Code, while only one of my projects requires an IDE from Jetbrain.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

Serious question - what is the difference? From what I can tell vscode has all the features you'd see in an IDE.

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iamreinder profile image
Reinder • Edited

An IDE is an integrated development environment. It differs from a code editor in that it has a lot of features integrated that you otherwise would run separately, like an (s)ftp client, debugging tools, etc.

The difference has become less clear since plugins for a code editor like VS code can give it an IDE feel, though still, these are plugins, not integrated parts of the software. And that for me makes all the difference.

To be able to make VS code work more like an IDE, you depend on a lot of plugins. Some of them are really good and well maintained. Even the free ones sometimes are. But the fact you're not paying for them, makes that you can't really rely on them as well. The author has no obligation towards you to keep it up to date, as opposed to a yearly contract with a company like JetBrains.

I'm a full stack developer, using mostly PHP and the Symfony framework for the backends I work on. PhpStorm truely is a no-brainer for our company. It's proven to be robust and feature rich. And quite honestly, if you compare the license fees to what a developer makes a year on average, it's a very defendable purchase.

If you can work with VS code just as well or even better than with a full fledged IDE, great! If you feel more at home with an IDE, don't cheap out on it. If you throw away half a day of work each year because you're struggling with your editor, the license fee of PhpStorm would be less than the rate of those lost hours.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

So the only difference between and IDE and a code editor is that a code editor uses plugins? Intellij uses a plugin system as well.

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vier31 profile image
Jan Schröder

The difference between an IDE and an editor is the difference between a Mac and a self build PC. One big selling points of Macs is, that the pieces of the hardware are curated for you in a way that they just work. No need to get your hands dirty installing some drivers and keeping things updated.

When using an IDE like one of JetBrains products, you get things like auto complete, VCS Integration, declaration references, debugger etc out of the box, set up for you.

Yes, they are technically plugins, but they are maintained by the same devs that build the main software.

Now, this is not to say one is better than the other. They are different tools for different tasks.

For example, at work I am using RubyMine and it is very easy to jump between React FE and Rails BE, with less effort required on my part than when using VS Code. I tried that one on the same project and it took too much effort to configure and maintain the same setup that I get (out of the box) with RubyMine.

On the other hand, on smaller projects, prototypes or sketches, I love using VS Code because of how snappy it is. RubyMine can feel sluggish at times in comparison.

Apples and oranges.

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iamreinder profile image
Reinder

As Jan Schröder mentions, the built-in tools are maintained by the same devs as the IDE. So the integration is really thight. And for the other plugins in an IDE, I use the same principal. Unpaid plugins are not reliable. If it's something like rainbow brackets, it's no big deal. Even though it's very handy, it doesn't block me in any way if it doesn't work. But some more specific tools for work that's hard to do in another way, I wouldn't want to depend on free plugins.

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Andrew Baisden

It comes down to personal preference why do you need to choose between one or the other? Why not just have multiple IDE/code editors installed and use whichever one you want depending on the project? I use Visual Studio for almost all of my programming projects. It's free and has dozens of extensions which is why it is the most popular code editor.

Lately though I have been learning mobile app development using Flutter/Dart. Android Studio and IntelliJ IDEA are probably better suited for this type of development which is why I have been using them. However Visual Studio Code is more than capable as well once you have it set up. Choice is good all are winners.

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gautham495 profile image
Gautham Vijayan Author

Thank you Andrew for sharing your experience with me!

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dwd profile image
Dave Cridland

VSCode is pretty minimal out of the box, but with effort, you can get it to do a lot - and with a very modern, slick UI.

JetBrains provides a suite of IDEs that work exceptionally well out of the box, and cover a range of languages. Plugins are very easy to add as well, and you can with very little effort at all end up with a great full-stack development environment.

I have plenty of friends who would rather put in the effort with VSCode, or Atom, or whatever. And it works for them. Me, I prefer to just install the JetBrains kit and get coding. I advise giving both a serious go, especially playing with the refactoring capability in the JetBrains IDEs, and explore polyglot programming as well - I've jumped into all sorts of languages at short notice just by being able to find the right JetBrains IDE or plugin for IntelliJ.

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Jacob Boyd

Like many of the comments are saying VS Code isn't an IDE. I do use it along side my IDEs though. Front end web development is great for VS Code, and I would even say when creating most scripts.

I like to use an IDE when working on backend of websites/APIs. They, imo, provide much better or smoother debugging workflows. It is possible to set many of those same features within VS Code, but IDEs like Visual Studio for dotnet, JetBrains for Java or Php(i've never used WebStorm) or Xcode for iOS development.

Saying one IDE is better than another is all a matter of taste, at least when working with the majors like Visual Studio or JetBrains products. Both are backed by great companies and both have a horde of users.

At the end of the day they are toolboxes, rather you want your screwdrivers on the right-side or left-side is up to you. The important thing is becoming familiar and comfortable with your toolbox, and then try pushing the limits of your tools.

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vier31 profile image
Jan Schröder

It’s a bit apples and oranges here.

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k0p1 profile image
Jason K.

I think the others have more or less sum up this discussion. Give both a try and see what you like!

VScode is pretty neat, but sometimes if I'm writing a short script I'd prefer to work just with subline text or the vim editor. Which once again, is just personal preference.

The most important thing is to have fun coding.

Cheers!

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Samantha Atkins

I could care less what is and isn't an IDE. Does it help me get my development and maintenance work done as easily as possible without getting in the way? Many an IDE frankly does not satisfy that. I may be a bit of a special case though. Except for better debugging support I will work away in Emacs much of the time. :) Much more real estate to see and spelunk the actual code without a lot of extraneous crap. And tools for many things that most IDEs do not make as straightforward.

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Samantha Atkins

I have been using various jetbrains tools for many years and especially pycharm and webstorm. What I most dislike is that they get in my way too much without being tweaked hard to be more to my liking. Also they are quite bloated randomly firing up well over 100% cpu and offering up random freezes. And this is on multiple platforms with a quite generous memory and cpu specs.

I am less experienced with VS Code but I haven't run into these issues. I also think that some parts of its interface are cleaner to at least my taste.

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Donny Verduijn

For me, the most important difference right now is, that VS Code currently has superb Docker integration. You can even open a workspace from inside a docker container and then use breakpoint debugging. WSL support is also great!

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RedCreator37

This is a highly personal choice, some prefer simpler text editors and others feature-rich IDEs. Since you have the student pack, why not just try out both and see which one works better for you?

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gautham495 profile image
Gautham Vijayan Author

Thank you. I will do that!

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Mubashir Hasan

Jetbrains Webstorm. It's the best ide in the market for web developers.

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gautham495 profile image
Gautham Vijayan Author

Thanks guys for giving your valuable info.

I will surely take your suggestions!!

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Max Sveshnikov

For Java - IntelliJ
For JS - VSCode

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fharook shaik

VS Code is simply a champ.