re: ​Linus Torvalds takes a break from Linux VIEW POST

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re: A "code of conduct" usually leads to a big influx of SJWs, destroying even the last remaining bit of meritocracy. This could be the end of Linux as...
 

A number of months back, I'd gone through and added the following CoC to all or our company's projects I do work on:

GitHub seems to recommend that projects should include a "code of conduct" — they even provide handy templates. However, the two that are currently on offer seem a bit officious and heavy-handed.

I'd quote Wil Wheaton on this. However, while the sentiment is correct and nicely to the point, some people might not like its specific wording. Suffice it to say, "we're all adults here, please act like it." Translation, "hatefully childish behavior won't be tolerated."

No time has been specifically allocated to broadening this project's contents nor allocated to their support beyond our specific use-cases. Project contents are provided "as is" - so, "buyer beware". Try to be nice and we'll try to return the behavior. Contribute or otherwise help us improve the project and we'll try to figure out a way to send you a virtual beer.

I think it gets the point across. Plus, it allows me to check off one more box on projects (slowly forcing teammates to GPG-sign all their commits is the current project).

 

GPG sign their commits? For what purpose? Be aware that I do understand what the whole GPG toolset can do and for what reason. I just don't see the point with signing commits, unless you are a large open source software project.

It will be more difficult to start contributing as a new member on the team = it will be longer until they start delivering value. It will be a constant annoyance to have to GPG sign your commits, unless you actually take the time to fully automate it, which by the sound of your post doesn't seem to be the case.

For what purpose?

Our customers want the appearance of traceability/non-repudiation.

It will be more difficult to start contributing as a new member on the team = it will be longer until they start delivering value.

It's literally a five-minute setup task.

It will be a constant annoyance to have to GPG sign your commits,

Have you ever actually taken the five minutes needed to set up git for commit-signing?? gpg-agent and similar tools make signing commits — whether you're a multiple-times-per hour or a "once at the end of the day" type of committer — pretty much transparent. Enter the key's password into the key-agent once during the session and that's it for the day.

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