re: What are common myths about software careers? VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

It's all about technical chops and "soft" skills don't matter. Communication is the single most important thing you're going to do. In fact, it's the only thing you're going to do: even the code you write is a long-running dialogue between you and your users, mediated through server processes. Getting good at communicating what you're thinking and doing, whether through talking, writing, presenting, teaching, or otherwise, is difficult. It's also critical if you want to be able to control the course of your career. The image of the lone inscrutable savant writing something So Advanced as to be beyond the ken of mere mortals is poisonous and people who take it as a role model do not have good long-term career prospects.

You have to be passionate about software. People here are going to tend to be passionate, but then dev.to is nothing if not a self-selecting audience. Anyone who wants or expects you to put in extra time because programming is important to you personally is hoping you're a sucker. Do what you have to if you stand to gain from it some other way, but in general: don't work for free. There are employers out there who realize that the time you aren't selling them is worth as much as the time you are.

 

Yes! I have average chops but above-average communication and this is brought me more success and happiness. I think software is useless if it doesn't solve real problems for real people, which is why communication is everything.

 

Couldn't agree more on the importance of soft skills. Developers are often under stress and the combination of IQ and EQ is the way too go. Lack of soft skills like composure and communication will easily break down the team.

 

I love your communication message. Sometimes it's easy to forget that we're just trying to communicate with our users and make them feel something. I'm getting better at my soft skills and this is part of it :)

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