re: What is the future of software development pay range? VIEW POST

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But claiming that math education isn't successful because less than 1% of folks learn calculus (a specific, frequently not mandatory, subset) is a bit disingenuous.

I brought up the calculus example not because I think calculus is special or hard but because it's simple and we have been teaching it for a long time. People just don't bother retaining the knowledge to use it in their daily life. I think programming is the same. Algorithmic thinking is a skill but most people just don't bother. This is before we even get to the logistical problems of developing good CS teaching materials and getting enough teachers versed in the material to teach it.

I would like nothing more than to have technology advance to the point that I didn't need to write code and that there were enough people around who could solve their own problems with computers instead of delegating the responsibility to a priestly class but given the historical evidence I just don't see it happening. For the foreseeable future programming will remain a rare enough skillset that salaries will not go down.

I don't think this is wishful thinking on my part just because I'm a programmer and want to continue getting paid a high salary. I think we are collectively bad at allocating educational resources to meet societal needs. There will continue to be a shortage of people versed in the algorithmic arts even if we start teaching CS concepts in kindergarten.

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