re: Daily Challenge #14 - Square into Squares VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

Here is my Rust version!

I started with an iterative solution, but I was working off a simplifying assumption that turned out to be false once I starting testing larger examples.

After I realized my simplification wasn't going to work I went for a recursive solution. I think it turned out pretty well! I also got to try out my first Macro in Rust so that was cool!

fn decompose_recursive(goal: u32, i: u32, curr: Vec<u32>) -> Option<Vec<u32>> {
    macro_rules! try_recusing {
        ( $goal:expr, $i:expr, $next:expr ) => {{
            let attempt = decompose_recursive($goal, $i, $next);

            if attempt.is_some() {
                return attempt;
            }
        }};
    }

    if goal == 0 {
        return Some(curr);
    }

    if i <= 0 {
        return None;
    }

    if goal >= i.pow(2) {
        let mut next = curr.clone();
        next.push(i);

        try_recusing!(goal - i.pow(2), i - 1, next);
    }

    try_recusing!(goal, i - 1, curr);

    None
}

pub fn decompose(n: u32) -> Option<Vec<u32>> {
    let reverse_vec = decompose_recursive(n.pow(2), n - 1, vec![])?;
    let vec = reverse_vec.iter().rev().cloned().collect();
    Some(vec)
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use crate::*;

    #[test]
    fn it_works_for_a_nonexistant_example() {
        assert_eq!(decompose(4), None);
    }

    #[test]
    fn it_works_for_the_dev_to_example() {
        assert_eq!(decompose(11), Some(vec![1, 2, 4, 10]));
    }

    #[test]
    fn it_works_for_50() {
        assert_eq!(decompose(50), Some(vec![1, 3, 5, 8, 49]));
    }
}
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