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Discussion on: Do you agree with intrusive time tracking software?

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cartinez profile image
F. Author

Yes, that's why agree with time tracking apps if they actually just track the time spent. If in 4 hours there are no commits or actual results to represent the time spent "working", that would be an indicator of unproductivity.

I would immediately try looking for an other opportuinity but my salary doesn't allow me to take a time off for now. We'll see how it will go.

I would also try to confront my manager/CTO with the issue, but I'm afraid they'll just think I'm the "lazy employee" who wants to waste time on job time.

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alexisfinn profile image
AlexisFinn

don't bother confronting your manager, if they're already this far down the rabbit hole, they'll undoubtedly just hear whatever they want to hear. All you're going to accomplish is increasing your blood pressure.

Tracking work time doesn't really make much sense in programming as it's generally a result obligation. So you don't want to track work-time, you want to track jobs done.

A good analogy is if you bring your car in for repair, and he says it'll be done by tomorrow and cost 200$, so you're paying to get your car repaired by tomorrow for 200$ and he must deliver on that, whether it takes him 5 minutes and he slacks off all the rest of the time or whether he spends all-night repairing your car, you don't care as long as he delivers on what was promised.

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rafo profile image
Rafael Osipov

If a developer investigates something, or is solving a complex problem, there would be no remote commits for a day or more. And it is okay. Using commits as a performance metric is not a good idea.

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themobiledev profile image
Chris McKay

I personally don't like commits being used as a metric. Right now, my team is working on a fairly large project and frequently, we don't commit until the very end of the day (or maybe even the next day). That's mostly because we're spending a lot of time writing, rewriting and discarding our code. Someone could see that as unproductive, but we're learning a bunch of new technologies as we work.