loading...

re: 5 reasons why scrum/agile is not working for you! From the view of an developer VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

Agile has some lofty assumptions. Primarily, that people can communicate efficiently and well:)

We should be able to go into a meeting and speak our minds regardless of who is at the table. Our statements should be based in non-accusatory/non-blaming behavior statements followed up by how it affects us personally and/or feeling statements crafted with reflection and honesty based in the personal experience as much as possible.

I should be able to tell my higher up how and why her idea negatively impacts the team-- and my higher up should understand that's how agile works: a team working together with full awareness of the situation so they can respond collectively. Impartially.

So, I think the issue lies more with how agile assumes good communication in a world where office communication is a good interpersonal communications course away from being effective.

As a PO and SE/Lead I enjoy knowing the tech. It requires humility and a constant questioning of which decisions are based in ego or laziness and which are customer focused, but at the end of the day, I'm able to understand my team's situation and accurately convert those situations to my clients for clear expectations to be set.

 

"As a PO and SE/Lead I enjoy knowing the tech. It requires humility and a constant questioning of which decisions are based in ego or laziness and which are customer focused, but at the end of the day, I'm able to understand my team's situation and accurately convert those situations to my clients for clear expectations to be set."

I agree with this 100%.

From my experience as a SE/Lead and PO, I think it's good to have a PO with some dev experience. Even, if only at a high-level. It's that kind of PO that will be able to see all sides clearly, which is imperative.

Also, I think it largely depends on the person leading. I understand tech but I also don't have the ego to think I know all the answers. That's not my style. If anything, I lead the discussion, ask questions and count on my team to lead with the dev solutions. I make sure that those solutions fall inline with the scope and the needs of the end customer and client. Scrum / Agile is all about open communication and the knowledge that there is a balance between roles.

 
 

If it is like this then your team is lucky and should deliever good quality software on time 😊 👍

 

this is how I see Agile, devs are artists, or Journalists having a bunch of pencils and erasers that might rip up the papers. but, we been asked to make things in a short time, that would require Typewriters, and papers recycling.

 

Agile has some lofty assumptions. Primarily, that people can communicate efficiently and well:)

I think it's exactly the opposite. It knows people cannot communicate efficiently. That's why the first idea starts with "Individuals and interactions". If the assumption was that communication is efficient, then processes and tools are the best approach.

 

This an interesting perspective, and I think I hear what you're saying:

Agile/Scrum is a structure put in place to streamline communication and productivity bc waterfall prevented folks from having the exchanges necessary to act as a team at all moments. Does this capture it?

If so, I agree Agile serves communication and does provide that support/structure. I still stand by my original statement, albeit with a deserved footnote: while Agile/Scrum serves communication in that its very purpose is to support and streamline communication (thanks again for this), it doesn't provide (explicitly) the interpersonal tools necessary to use it.

Put another way, it's been my experience that Agile is a like a drill: a tool that can make life easier if you know how to use it. Deferring back to my original comment here: folks often are not able to speak up or be aware of others' perspectives or the situation in such a way that uses Agile well.

As my other comment in the post said. Agile is just a set of ideas. It is not a tool or process. It's basically "it does not matter how you want to work, but we think that these 4 ideas should be leading."

The agile ideas are to counter problems with waterfall, and other rigid processes. In those there is the assumption that earlier steps had perfect outcome for the follow-up steps. So the created plans, designs, and specifications (which are forms of communication) are efficient and effective. Something which time has proven rarely is the case.

Another part is that the customer might have failed to properly convey the problem. A clear failure in efficient communication. Engaging with the customer more often can result in all parties properly understanding the problem at hand.

You could say that the agile manifesto says that we suck at efficient communication. So we need to do it more.

Thanks for the feedback.

I think ideas can be tools, so I'm unable to split that hair any further. I also think there is no such thing as "no process" (even being agile in response to an obstacle is a process- just not an inflexible one), so I also can't go further down that hole today:D

What it seems like is that we both agree humans do not communicate well. You think Agile helps this. I also think Agile can help this: however...

I think Agile is often misused and misunderstood and cannot help unless the right mentality for communication is set.

You either understand Agile or you don't. I agree with the OP that teams using Agile can fail to actually be agile. Because I've seen folks repeat the phrases from their agile courses and just not have the understanding to actually implement the philosophy behind them, O understand where the OP is coming from.

But nudged with good support and open communication, I've seen Agile thrive as well. It needed the nudge though.

Read another of your comments about scrum v agile and tools. Good point.

I still think Agile is a tool (only bc ideas are tools for me), but I hear your pov. Thanks for the insights.

Code of Conduct Report abuse