re: How do you convince a client to a static website? VIEW POST

VIEW PARENT COMMENT VIEW FULL DISCUSSION
 

It really depends on the client.

Yes, sir. And that's my main beef with this article. The OP is asking how to convince the client that static websites are best for them, whereas this decision should be based on a rational and far-sighted analysis of their requirements.

being cheapos who want to install a plugin for a contact form instead of paying a dev to do it

Really? Is that your stand?

I'm all for empowering clients. But when you've worked as long as I have, you've probably come across some clients that will nickel and dime you for services.

The kind of client that gets upset over charges for "updating the website" when you have to spend time swapping text and images they're indecisive over (and wanted moved around 3-4x). The same client that'll often insist to do work themselves, or in some other cases, outsource labor to cheaper places, and in even worse cases -- come back with broken code from that cheaper dev and ask you to fix it.

I'm not saying every client is like this, but I will say that these are the clients who prefer "simpler" plug and play solutions like Wordpress. It's the kind of client that doesn't respect your time as a professional. The same kind of client that'll pervade any service industry (like plumbing, car detailing, etc).

Again, we have to put things into perspective. Maybe the client is a WordPress user and knows that a simple plugin can solve the problem for the time being. And maybe they aren't a WordPress user, but a simple plugin does cover the use case.

I agree about the existence of such clients, and I personally make a run when I smell bullshit on the table, but the point here is not the ethics of clients but making the right decision.

Yes, sometimes static site generators make sense, but you have to be sane about your decision making.

code of conduct - report abuse