re: How do you convince a client to a static website? VIEW POST

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Performance and security are poorly defined and definitely overrated. Are you telling me no WordPress installation is safe from hacking? Or that no static website can be hacked? And what about performance? I currently maintain a WordPress website that sees 2 million visitors a month, and it all works well on two load-balanced servers of 8GB each, with about half the RAM free most of the time. What more "performance" do you want from a website/blog?

The developer's enjoyment is not the only point of view. At the end of the day, those of us in consulting are paid to provide the most optimal solution for the least possible cost. I'm all for coding chops and intellectual amusements, but we should reserve these for personal projects. Just look at how you've phrased your question: How do you convince a client . . .

Really? If you've understood their use case, you can sell the right solution to them, provided you understand it too. Wasn't it a better way to start by describing their needs and then searching for a solution?

Fair point. But you forgot there are clients that need smaller websites with smaller budget for development. You cannot say SPG is not good choice for those clients, IMO.

smaller websites with smaller budget

I think you've really got it backwards.

Assume I'm a small client with a very tight budget. I want a fully responsive website with (or without) a blog management software and integration with a few analytics tools. This can be done within half an hour in WordPress, and there's a good chance I can find someone who can even do this for free.

How do static site generators even compete? I'll need a developer to add another page next time, and there's no way I can ever add any dynamic functionality if I ever need one later on.

Please explain how that delivers me the solution I need, faster and in a smaller budget?

Use this and you have a full funcional site in matter or minutes:
github.com/netlify-templates/one-c...

Let's stop here, because we are not on the same page. Let's agree that we don't agree.

Yes, we should definitely stop. Overexcitement is the bane of our industry.

Can I just hop on here to say that this is the most gloriously civil end to a discussion that I've ever seen on the internet.

I hope you were not being sarcastic. 😂 Anyway, there's no point in arguing beyond a point. We need people who refuse to tow the line and persist with new technologies and ideas, because ultimately they bring the change. Today this is happening with the Elixir community (and maybe even Serverless and NoSQL), and a decade down the line we'll all be thankful for it.

😇 Cool, because I was pretty damned worked up during that exchange. 😛

Today this is happening with the Elixir community
That Elixir is better than everything else? I do admit, it looks like a nice language but that probably because I like Ruby.

Again, "better than everything else" is a fallacy. Some techs are fundamentally better at some things than the others, but mass adoption is also important. Elixir is a near-perfect ecosystem for web development, and it's waiting for enough Ruby businesses to cross over.

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